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Fig. 14 | Fluids and Barriers of the CNS

Fig. 14

From: Elimination of substances from the brain parenchyma: efflux via perivascular pathways and via the blood–brain barrier

Fig. 14

Four studies of brain glucose content versus glucose concentration in blood. In two studies glucose content was measured by chemical assay, a in anaesthetized rats by Buschiazzo et al. [319] and b in isolated perfused brains from dogs by Betz et al. [327]. In the latter it was assumed that brain water was 0.75 mL g−1. In the other two studies glucose content was determined by magnetic resonance spectroscopy, c in conscious humans by Gruetter et al. [337] and d in lightly anaesthetized rats by Choi et al. [338]. In all studies the glucose content continues to increase with plasma concentration even though it is known that the influx of glucose shows saturation. The explanation is that efflux also saturates and the increase in content must parallel the increase in plasma concentration in order for efflux to increase so that it is equal to influx minus the constant rate of glucose metabolism (see Appendix D)

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