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Fig. 4 | Fluids and Barriers of the CNS

Fig. 4

From: SCO-spondin, a giant matricellular protein that regulates cerebrospinal fluid activity

Fig. 4

Schematic drawing of rat SCO and RF. A Schematic drawing of sagittal section of the adult rat brain showing the cerebral cavities (in blue), highlighting the subcommissural organ (SCO, in red) at the caudal dorsal diencephalon, and Reissner fiber (RF in green) that extends along the cerebral aqueduct (CA), forth ventricle (4-V) and the central canal of the spinal cord. B Schematic drawing of a sagittal section of the SCO. The radial cells are arranged in a pseudostratified epithelium composed of a cell body in contact with CSF of the third ventricle (3-V) and a basal process that traverses the posterior commissure (PC) and ends at the external membrane or on blood vessels (BV). At the apical membrane, the SCO-spondin secreted into CSF gradually aggregates to form the RF, first as flocculent material on the cell surface, then as fibrils that aggregate to form the pre-RF, and finally as the RF that reaches the CA. This aggregation requires the ciliary movement of the ependymal cells and CSF turbulence (round arrows) generated at the entrance of the CA. C Schematic representation of the RF (in green) inside the central canal of the spinal cord, showing the ciliated ependymal cells, being the motile ventral cilia four times more numerous than the dorsal ones [230] and the cerebrospinal fluid contacting neurons (CSFcN in blue). The RF binds and transports various molecules (see main text for details)

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