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Fig. 6 | Fluids and Barriers of the CNS

Fig. 6

From: Chronic extradural compression of spinal cord leads to syringomyelia in rat model

Fig. 6

MRI and pathology after decompression. a Eight weeks after the operation to induce syringomyelia, the syrinx appeared in the center of the T10–12 spinal cord (red arrow). At the same time, cotton strips under the T13 lamina can be seen. b Four weeks after the cotton strip and T13 lamina were removed, CSF signals reappear in the subarachnoid space of the compression area (white arrow). The syrinx was significantly narrowed (red arrow). c Eight weeks after decompression, the syrinx was further reduced compared with that at 4 weeks. A series of MRI images from the syringomyelia operation to decompression. e Syringomyelia was clearly observed in the center of the spinal cord before decompression. f Four weeks after decompression, the T13 lamina and cotton strip disappeared. The number of syrinxes in the center of the spinal cord decreased, but the volume increased significantly. Many syrinxes appeared to merge into one. g Eight weeks after decompression, the volume of the syrinx increased (white arrow). d, h Eight weeks after decompression, the L1 spinal cord was transected and underwent Luxol fast blue (LFB) staining. d The image is of the spinal cord of the rat in which the syrinx is reduced after decompression. The space between the dura mater, arachnoid and spinal cord is very large, and the arachnoid does not adhere to the surface of the spinal cord (red arrow). In this way, CSF in the subarachnoid space will flow smoothly. h The image is of the spinal cord of the rat in which the syrinx continues to enlarge after decompression. The dura mater and arachnoid of the L1 spinal cord have multiple adhesions on the surface of the spinal cord (black arrow). This phenomenon will reduce CSF flow

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