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Fig. 1 | Fluids and Barriers of the CNS

Fig. 1

From: Intracranial pressure elevation alters CSF clearance pathways

Fig. 1

Schematic model description. The model relates the unknown \(p_0 = p_{\text {SAS}}\) and \(p_1 = p_{\text {PVS}}\) and three main exit pathways. CSF formed by production (\({\text {Q}}_{{\text {prod}}}\)) and infused fluid (\({\text {Q}}_{{\text {inf}}}\)) enter the SAS from the left. The first outflow route is via the arachnoid granulations (AG) where CSF is absorbed by the dural sinuses. The second route is via the cribriform plate (crib), where CSF is absorbed by extracranial lymphatic vessels. In the third outflow route, CSF enters the arterial paravascular spaces (aPVS), the fluid continues along gaps surrounding the capillaries (gaps) or enter the extracellular space (ECS) via the arterial inter-endfeet gaps (aIEG), before entering the venous paravascular spaces (vPVS) via the venous inter-endfeet gaps (vIEG), where the fluid is assumed to return to the SAS. The model also include filtration from the capillaries related to the effective capillary pressure (\(p_{\text {e}}\))and in a variation of the model fluid flows directly from vPVS to cervical lympathics via pial sleeves (\(p_v\)). The SAS is considered as one pressure dependent compliance compartment (C), which is related to the reference pressure (\(p_{\text {r}}\))

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