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Table 2 Examples in which combinations of compartments are used

From: The need for mathematical modelling of spatial drug distribution within the brain

Model Blood Brain ECF Brain ICF Brain tissue CSF Periphery
Collins [212] 1 1 1
Stevens [136] 1 1 1
Jung [210] 4 1 1
Linninger [211] 14 1 5
Gaohua [145] 1 1 2 10+
Westerhout [137] 1 0.5a 0.5a 1 4 1
Nhan [126] 1 1 1 b
Ehlers [106] 1 1 c
Westerhout [138] 1 1 2 2
Westerhout [139] 1 1 4 2
Kielbasa [140] 1 1 1 1
Ball [142] 1 1 1 1 8
Yamamoto [141] 1 1 1 4 2
Yamamoto [143] 2 1 2 4 2
  1. A wide range of compartmental models exists and therefore we limit ourselves to descriptions of the examples we have mentioned in the text. Compartments include the blood, the brain ECF, the brain ICF, the brain tissue, the CSF and the periphery. The brain tissue represents the brain ECF and the brain ICF together. The periphery refers to components related to other organs than the brain. Numbers indicate the amount of compartments that are used for each component. For example, in the model of Yamamoto [143] (see Fig. 14), two compartments are used for the blood to describe both the blood in the microvasculature (the brain capillaries) and in the larger vessels, while four compartments are used for the CSF to describe the several regions where the CSF resides. Stripes (–) indicate that the component is not described
  2. aThe brain ECF and brain ICF are modelled as one compartment (the brain tissue)
  3. bThe CSF clearance is included as a loss term in the description of the brain ECF compartment.
  4. cThe brain ECF is taken together with the brain extravascular space in one compartment