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Fig. 1 | Fluids and Barriers of the CNS

Fig. 1

From: Cerebral influx of Na+ and Cl as the osmotherapy-mediated rebound response in rats

Fig. 1

Plasma electrolyte concentrations in response to NaCl osmotherapy (elevated plasma osmolarity). A functional nephrectomy was performed in rats prior to i.p. treatment with isosmolar NaCl (control) or hyperosmolar NaCl (osmotherapy) and compared to non-operated naïve rats. a Plasma creatinine concentrations (in mM) in naïve rats (0.018 ± 0.001, n = 3), control rats (0.061 ± 0.002, n = 9), and osmotherapy-treated rats (0.063 ± 0.001, n = 9). b Plasma urea concentrations (in mM) in naïve rats (4.7 ± 0.2, n = 3), control rats (9.1 ± 0.3, n = 9), and rats exposed to osmotherapy (9.7 ± 0.5, n = 9). c Plasma osmolarity (in mOsm) of naïve rats (n = 3), control rats (n = 9), and rats exposed to osmotherapy (n = 9). d, e The plasma electrolyte concentrations (in mM) in naïve rats (135.6 ± 0.5 Na+ and 109.0 ± 0.6 Cl, n = 3), control rats (130.0 ± 0.6 Na+ and 105.6 ± 0.7 Cl, n = 9) and rats exposed to osmotherapy (156.5 ± 0.5 Na+ and 140.7 ± 0.8 Cl, n = 9). Statistically significant differences were determined by a one-way ANOVA with Dunnett’s multiple comparisons post hoc test in a, b and Tukey’s multiple comparisons post hoc test in ce. Asterisk above the scatter plots indicates statistical significance compared to naïve rats (a, b) or control rats (ce). ***p < 0.001, ns not significant

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